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How Having a “Sweet Tooth” Can Cause Wrinkles.

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Most people love to have too much sweets in their diet without regard to getting overweight, which may lead to obesity and other problems related to too much sugar intake such as wrinkles.

According to Kerry Neville, a registered dietitian and spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association, “Americans eat too much sugar, and it appears that the threat of making them fat doesn’t seem to discourage excess sugar eating. So this latest wrinkle scare might just do the trick. That is great.”

We all know how far women would go just to stop the aging process, and the prospect of getting wrinkles from too much sugar consumption may affect their physical, emotional, and psychological well-being. Some women may even develop inferiority complex, and experience stress and anxiety due to aging problems.

Image result for sweet tooth wrinkles

A recent study in the British Journal of Dermatology reveals that a process called glycation occurs when sweets — not just refined sugar, but anything that turns into glucose during metabolism in your body — are eaten and the glucose enters the bloodstream. As they float along, they search out and latch on to proteins and form a new molecule called advanced glycation end products, or appropriately shortened to AGEs.

The increase in sugar consumption also increases AGEs production. These molecules wreak havoc on the adjacent proteins, the most vulnerable of which are the compounds responsible for keeping our skin firm and elastic: collagen and elastin. The result is sagging, wrinkled skin.

However, here’s the good news for all those who have a “sweet tooth.” There are some things we can still do to remedy the damage being brought about by too much sugar in your diet. Obviously, you have to limit your sugar intake. “The lower your sugar consumption, the better it is for your health,” said Neville.

But it’s not easy to ascertain where those added sugars are coming from. “Eliminating them all is hard,” said Neville. “Often it is a matter of where you are getting the added sugar. Food labels don’t spell out added sugars.” It is important to look for words such as corn sweetener, corn syrup, sucrose or sorghum, to name a few.

 

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